Historic and Picturesque Kensington Train Station

The Kensington and Area Tourist Association is presently located at the Kensington Railyards, adjacent to the historical and picturesque Kensington Train Station. Tourist information, Internet/email access (provided by the Kensington Community Access Program), and many unique local crafts are available here from mid June to September.

While visiting our Tourist Information Center, take time to enjoy the wide selection of local crafts, send off an email, or visit the nearby Museum. Every Saturday brings the Farmers Market with a wonderful variety of produce, crafts and a display of local talents. There is always something for everyone!

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE TRAIN STATION

The first locomotive to pass through Kensington was in 1874. It consisted of an engine and two box cars. The passenger seats on the train were made of straps of wood about three to four inches wide. The first railway tracks were the narrow guage, 3 feet/6 inches. These tracks were later converted to the standard width during the years of 1919 to 1926.

The present railway station was built in 1905 by M. F. Schurman Ltd. It was the third station built in Kensington and was constructed from stone brought here from the Mirimichi region of New Brunswick. ( A second stone station was built in Alberton using the same stone.) This station was divided into three main sections. There was the Eastern Waiting Room, which was used for the men, the Western Waiting Room, which was used by the women and dividing them was the Station Agents Office.

The station provided service to regular passenger traffic until 1969 when Canadian National discontinued passenger train service on P.E.I. At this time, Canadian National opted for bus service to the mainland trains, and the station provided bus passenger service until it was closed by CN in the mid 1980's. It still saw regular freight train service pass by until the railway abandoned all tracks on P.E.I., in December, 1989. After closing, the station was designated a National Historic Site and was sold to the Town of Kensington.

If you have watched "The Emily of New Moon" series on TV, you will have seen this train station, as it was perfectly suited for their needs as a filming site. There has also been an exact replica of it built at "Anne's World" in Japan.

The Station is presently being used as the Town Library and as a museum for the P.E.I. Railway Heritage Association and the Kensington & Area Historical Society.


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